Archive for June, 2017

WFS News: fossil Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi reveals lifestyle of ancient armor-plated reptile

@WFS,World Fossil Society,Riffin T Sajeev,Russel T Sajeev An exceptionally-preserved fossil from the Alps in eastern Switzerland has revealed the best look so far at an armoured reptile from the Middle Triassic named Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi. The fossil is extremely rare in that it contains the animal’s complete skeleton, giving an Anglo-Swiss research team a very clear […]

WFS News:Rapid rise of the Mesozoic sea dragons

@WFS,World Fossil Society,Riffin T Sajeev,Russel T Sajeev In the Mesozoic, the time of the dinosaurs, from 252 to 66 million years ago, marine reptiles such as ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs were top predators in the oceans. But their origins and early rise to dominance have been somewhat mysterious. New research published this week in the journal […]

Tiny fossils reveal backstory of the most mysterious amphibian alive

The fossils of an extinct species from the Triassic Period are the long-missing link that connects Kermit the Frog’s amphibian brethren to wormlike creatures with a backbone and two rows of sharp teeth, new research shows. Named Chinlestegophis jenkinsi, the newfound fossil is the oldest relative of the most mysterious group of amphibians: caecilians. Today, these limbless, colorful serpentine carnivores live underground and range in size from 6 inches to 5 feet.

WFS News: A Gigantic Shark from the Lower Cretaceous Duck Creek Formation of Texas

@WFS,World Fossil Society,Riffin T Sajeev,Russel T Sajeev Citation: Frederickson JA, Schaefer SN, Doucette-Frederickson JA (2015) A Gigantic Shark from the Lower Cretaceous Duck Creek Formation of Texas. PLoS ONE 10(6): e0127162. Abstract:Three large lamniform shark vertebrae are described from the Lower Cretaceous of Texas. We interpret these fossils as belonging to a single individual […]

Fossil holds new insights into how fish evolved onto land

The fossil of an early snake-like animal — called Lethiscus stocki — has kept its evolutionary secrets for the last 340-million years. Now, an international team of researchers has revealed new insights into the ancient Scottish fossil that dramatically challenge our understanding of the early evolution of tetrapods, or four-limbed animals with backbones.

WFS news: Massive vertebrae sheds new light on Alamosaurus sanjuanensis

@WFS,World Fossil Society,Riffin T Sajeev,Russel T Sajeev The discovery nearly two decades ago of nine beautifully articulated vertebrae at Big Bend National Park is shedding new light on a 66 million-year-old sauropod native to Texas and the North American southwest called Alamosaurus sanjuanensis. Paleontologists from the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas have […]

World’s ‘first named dinosaur’ reveals new teeth with scanning tech!

Pioneering technology has shed fresh light on the world’s first scientifically-described dinosaur fossil — over 200 years after it was first discovered — thanks to research.

Brazilian carnivorous mammal-like reptile fossil may be new Aleodon species

@WFS,World Fossil Society,Riffin T Sajeev,Russel T Sajeev Some Late Triassic Brazilian fossils of mammal-like reptiles, previously identified as Chiniquodon, may in fact be the first Aleodon specimens found outside Africa, according to a study published June 14, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Agustín Martinelli from the Universidade Federal of Rio Grande do […]

WFS News : Corals reveals source of 1586 Sanriku, Japan tsunami

@WFS,World Fossil Society,Riffin T Sajeev,Russel T Sajeev A team of researchers, led by Dr. Rhett Butler, geophysicist at the University of Hawai’i at M?noa (UHM), re-examined historical evidence around the Pacific and discovered the origin of the tsunami that hit Sanriku, Japan in 1586 — a mega-earthquake from the Aleutian Islands that broadly impacted the […]

Geology, biology agree on Pangaea supercontinent breakup dates

@WFS,World Fossil Society,Riffin T Sajeev,Russel T Sajeev Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have found that independent estimates from geology and biology agree on the timing of the breakup of the Pangaea supercontinent into today’s continents. When continents break up, single species are divided into two and drift apart — physically and genetically. Lead […]